Tentative Agenda

Monday, April 10, 2017

This day will feature crucial information for workforce professionals and their partners regarding equal opportunity (EO) laws, roles and responsibilities and processes.

Who Should Attend:

  • Workforce frontline staff that work with job seekers (case managers, employment specialists, etc.)
  • Workforce program staff and leaders
  • State and local EO officers
  • Business services staff
  • All workforce partner staff, including rehabilitative services and adult education
     

8:15 – 9:00
Registration

9:00 – 10:15                       
Workshops 1

EO Law 101
This introductory session will cover who is protected by Equal Opportunity (EO) laws, what they prohibit, definitions for protected classes/categories as well as an overview of discriminatory practices. Disability and reasonable accommodation will also be discussed.

Gender Discrimination
The law forbids gender discrimination - treating someone unfavorably because of that person’s sex - when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, etc. Learn more about this law and strategies for identifying and avoiding sex discrimination in the work environment.

Service Strategies for Individuals with Cognitive Impairments
Discover methods and resources for serving customers with cognitive impairments, including how to recognize this spectrum of disability, and how to appropriately approach and effectively serve these customers through a variety of partners and assets.

10:15 – 10:30                     
Networking Break

10:30 – 11:45                     
Workshops 2

Roles and Responsibilities of an EO Officer
Appropriate for newly-appointed EO officers and those with more experience, this session will identify which programs are held to Civil Rights Center’s (CRC) EO standards, discuss the nondiscrimination plan, meeting compliance, responsibilities as a liaison to the CRC and more.

Section 188 WIOA Section 29, Part 38
All recipients under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) are responsible for ensuring equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in programs and activities funded under WIOA. Gain a better understanding of what this responsibility includes and how the regulations apply to activities operated through the One-Stop delivery system. Session repeats at 3:00 p.m.

Promising Practices In Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity:  A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide
Learn how to use the information, technical assistance and best practices available in the Section 188 Disability Reference Guide to help One-Stop centers and their partners meet nondiscrimination and universal access requirements for individuals with disabilities.

12:00 – 1:30                       
Lunch and Keynote

1:30 – 2:45                          
Workshops 3

Monitoring for Equal Opportunity Data Analysis – Supersession Part 1 
The first in a 2-part series, this session will cover statistical analysis and monitoring of those served in One-Stop centers through federal programs, including demographic information about program registrants. Learn how to be sure you are proportionally serving your customers with respect to demographics.

Serving Transgender Customers at American Job Centers
Discussion will include awareness and understanding, data, best practices for non-discrimination, common manifestations of discrimination (at centers and in the workplace), and the current legal discourse regarding transgender persons, including federal, state and local protections.

Autism Spectrum Disorders and Employment
How much do you know about Autism Spectrum Disorder?  Enough to help someone with autism reach their career goals?  This session will share top tips for working with those on the autism spectrum. 

2:45 – 3:00                          
Networking Break

3:00 – 4:15                          
Workshops 4

Monitoring for Equal Opportunity Data Analysis – Supersession Part 2
The second in a 2-part series, this session will continue providing information regarding statistical analysis and monitoring of those served in One-Stop centers through federal programs, including demographic information about program registrants. Learn how to be sure you are proportionally serving your customers with respect to demographics.

Section 188 WIOA Section 29, Part 38
All recipients under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) are responsible for ensuring equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in programs and activities funded under WIOA. Gain a better understanding of what this responsibility includes and how the regulations apply to activities operated by the One-Stop delivery system. Repeat of 10:30 am session.

ADA Standards for Accessible Design
Learn about ADA standards for accessibility and how to design a service center or workplace that incorporates these standards into physical and technology elements for effective service to customers/staff with disabilities.

 

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

This day will feature crucial information for workforce professionals and their partners regarding equal opportunity (EO) laws, roles and responsibilities and processes.

Who Should Attend:

  • Workforce frontline staff that work with job seekers (case managers, employment specialists, etc.)
  • Workforce program staff and leaders
  • State and local EO officers
  • Business services staff
  • All workforce partner staff, including rehabilitative services and adult education
     

8:15 – 9:00                          
Registration

9:00 – 10:15                       
Workshops 1

Nondiscrimination Plans
This session will cover the state Nondiscrimination Plans and best practices, with detailed discussion of the nine required elements formerly known as the Methods of Administration (MOA).

Disability Law
This session will provide an overview of the Federal civil rights laws that ensure equal opportunity for people with disabilities. Learn how these laws apply to workplace and hiring processes and how you can make the work environment more inclusive.

Welcoming Diversity
Learn about creating an open and inclusive environment through discussion of diversity classifications, working with diverse populations, cultural sensitivity and approaching sensitive conversation regarding race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, disability, etc. Session repeats on April 12 at 9:00 am.

10:15 – 10:45                     
Networking Break

10:45 – 12:00                     
Workshops 2

Workplace Harassment
Learn to prevent, recognize and report workplace harassment, whether harassment is based on race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, disability, etc. This session will cover harassment laws, policies and procedures. Session repeats on April 12 at 9:00 am.

Road to Re-Entry: Criminal Records, Ban the Box and Getting Back into the Workforce
Reentry experts will discuss barriers and solutions, “ban the box” efforts, how criminal background checks can create civil rights concerns and more. Learn to educate yourself, employers and customers about this issue and what key resources are available to get returning citizens back into the workforce. Session repeats on April 12 at 10:45 am.

Complaint Processing Procedures
Uncover the details and requirements of processing complaints of alleged discrimination against WIOA recipients, including who can file complaints, types of complaints, information required, acceptable formats and timeframes, record-keeping requirements, and how these claims are processed, evaluated and resolved.

12:00 – 1:00                       
Lunch

1:15 – 2:30                          
Workshops 3

Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Protections
This session will cover prohibition of national origin discrimination as it affects persons with limited English proficiency and provide tools and resources for language assistance to those with this barrier to employment and service delivery. Language access providers, interpreters, potential funding for services, responsibilities to provide service and more will be discussed.

 

HR Consultation: Who's Lawfully Responsible for Hiring Practices and Decisions?
While the employer is ultimately responsible for hiring decisions, what liability is assumed by a workforce professional (resource room staff, business services staff, one-stop staff, etc.) or third-party recruiter or staffing agency professional during the hiring process? This session will help you understand the extent of that obligation.

Michigan EO Peer-to-Peer (Supersession from 1:15 to 4:15) – By Invite Only
You understand your responsibilities as an EO Officer. You’re loaded up with information. This is an opportunity for you to discuss challenges, best practices, resources, policy development, strategies for staff improvement and additional training needs with your Michigan EO Officer peers.

2:30 – 3:00                          
Networking Break

3:00 – 4:15                          
Workshops 4

Job Descriptions and Hiring Practices - What Can and Cannot Be asked?
When does employer preference cross a legal line? Discussion includes best practices in job posting descriptions that meet Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, addressing potential discrimination, what can and cannot be asked in a posting or on an application, during a screening process and more. Session repeats on April 12 at 3:00 pm.

Reasonable Accommodation Policy Development
Understanding the procedures that govern the provision of reasonable accommodation for employees and applicants with disabilities is only the first step. This session will focus on accommodations required by law and how workforce agencies and others can develop internal compliance policies and training that will inform staff for effective policy implementation.

 

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

This day will feature updated information on hot topics relating to equal opportunity and populations at risk for discrimination.

Who Should Attend: 

  • April 10-11 audience, plus
    • HR professionals
    • All employers and business owners
    • Non-workforce system EO officers
    • Colleges and universities
    • Private recruiters
    • Staffing companies
    • Anyone who works with employers in the hiring process
       

8:15 – 9:00
Registration

9:00 – 10:15                       
Workshops 1

Welcoming Diversity
Learn about creating an open and inclusive environment through discussion of diversity classifications, working with diverse populations, cultural sensitivity and approaching sensitive conversation regarding race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, disability, etc. Repeat of April 11, 9:00 am session

Workplace Harassment
Learn to prevent, recognize and report workplace harassment, whether harassment is based on race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, disability, etc. This session will cover harassment laws, policies and procedures. Repeat of April 11, 9:00 am session.

LGBTQ Updates from an HR Perspective
What laws protect the LGBTQ community? What are the federal EEOC and state positions on this group as a protected class with regard to workplace discrimination? This session will discuss LGBTQ updates from an HR perspective and provide context and clarity to different terms.

10:15 – 10:45                     
Networking Break

10:45 – 12:00                     
Workshops 2

Road to Re-Entry: Criminal Records, Ban the Box and Getting Back into the Workforce
Reentry experts will discuss barriers and solutions, “ban the box” efforts, how criminal background checks can create civil rights concerns and more. Learn to educate yourself, employers and customers about this issue and what key resources are available to get returning citizens back into the workforce. Repeat of April 11, 10:45 am session.

Social Media Discrimination and Harassment
This session will focus on social media phenomena with regard to employment discrimination and harassment. How does social media blur the lines of work life and personal life? How can social media play a role in hiring practices and the workplace? Get your questions answered!

Reasonable Accommodation
Learn what reasonable accommodation entails, what your responsibilities are as an employer and how to effectively tap into an underutilized talent pool by accessing resources to help you navigate reasonable accommodation tools and techniques.

12:00 – 1:00                       
Lunch

1:15 – 2:30                          
Workshops 3

EEOC Complaint/Digital Charge System
This session will cover the process for filing complaints through the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and its digital charge system. How to file, what to expect once a charge has been submitted, resolving charges, prohibited practices, and record keeping will be discussed.

EEOC Enforcement Guidance on Religious and National Origin Discrimination
Immigrant workers are present in every occupation in the United States and are largely represented in many of the emerging, fastest-growing industries. The United States is also a country of vast religious diversity. This session will focus on how EO laws protect people of different religious backgrounds and national origins, as well as the assumptions that are often made about them.

Recognizing and Preventing Sexual Harassment
Federal statutes, state statues, municipal codes/ordinances and employee handbooks all define sexual harassment and prescribe rules and appropriate retribution. Gain clarity on sexual harassment laws and internal rules, preventing and recognizing harassment, investigative techniques and precautions, how to address hostile work environments and more.

2:30 – 3:00                          
Networking Break

3:00 – 4:15                          
Workshops 4

Job Descriptions and Hiring Practices - What Can and Cannot Be Asked?
When does employer preference cross a legal line? Discussion includes best practices in job posting descriptions that meet Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, addressing potential discrimination, what can and cannot be asked in a posting or on an application, during a screening process and more. Repeat of April 11, 3:00 pm session.

ADA, GINA and Wellness Programs
Employer wellness programs are subject to rules under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). The session will provide an overview of the final rules and what employers need to know in order to operate a compliant program.

Equal Pay/Wages
Almost 50 years after the Equal Pay Act became law, women are paid on average 77 cents for every dollar paid to men. The wage gap has narrowed, but still persists. Learn more about pay discrimination and what measures are being taken to close the gap.

The Association

The Michigan Works! Association was established in 1987 to provide services and support to Michigan’s workforce development system. Through the association, members can access timely, relevant professional development opportunities and ensure high-quality programs for all customers.

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The System

The Michigan Works! System is the first unified workforce development system in the U.S. and is an integral partner in developing Michigan’s economic future. The system is demand driven, locally responsive, and ready to meet the needs of each community. Every year, the Michigan Works! System serves nearly four million customers.

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History Of Innovation

A visionary process that spanned several decades, covering both Democratic and Republican administrations, culminated in 1996 with the creation of the Michigan Works! System— the first statewide, unified workforce development system in the country. Today, the Michigan Works! System serves as a model to other states and countries and has been emulated based on its widespread and long-standing success.